Web 2.5

Darren Kuropatwa remarked on the development of Web 2.0 learners over a period of 12 months.
‘Last year I left the conference hearing everyone saying things like:
I have to learn flickr
I have to learn wikis
I have to learn blogs
I have to learn [insert social media tool du jour]
This year the buzz was much more about pedagogy. The talk in the halls sounded like:

» I can use [this] to teach [that]
» I can see how much easier it would be for my students to understand if I used …
» My students are going to LOVE learning this way!’

This is interesting for a couple of reasons. Firstly, it takes time to get to the educational purpose of new Web 2.0 tools. First you play, and then you think about how you could use the tool to enhance teaching and learning. Or you find out how someone else is using it. Secondly, the first stage, that is,
playing with the new toys, is a necessary step. What’s the implication? You don’t play – you don’t get it. You don’t get the bug, you don’t get to the point. Another supposition: the people who went to the conference in the first place were probably the ones who were already open to new things. They turned up ready to hear about something new. The ones who didn’t go may be more difficult to convince. They might hear others raving about the pedagogical this and that of the new tools, but they have to actually play to get hooked in the first place, and only then perhaps start having lightbulb moments about educational potential.

Having joined Edna Groups a while ago, an unreasonably large number of them, I’ve recently participated (minimally) in Kerrie Smith’s ‘blogging corner’. I’m so grateful to Kerrie and others for taking the time to organise this group, allowing bloggers and bloggers-to-be to interact with each other and find out what they’re doing, and how they’re using Web 2.0 tools in the classroom. And it’s good to share. I get a thrill out of seeing people get excited about new things, the same as I did.

Blogging corner, like other groups, give structure within a social context. Kerrie has posted starting points for discussion, eg. ‘what do you use to blog’, ‘where is your blog’, ‘recommended blogs’ blogging tools, forums, questions and answers, ‘blogs in the classroom’, ‘monitoring blogs’, etc.
Very useful for busy people is the weekly challenge which is not overwhelming, but gives you an opportunity to do something small, and connects you with new people all sharing, commenting, thanking and encouraging. Talk about community. I’m so grateful to Kerrie and others for making this possible (sounds like I’m collecting a Logie).

We’re all moving along, like the shrimp on the treadmill (hope that analogy offends nobody) of my very first post earlier this year, when I started the SLAV steps program. And as long as I’m moving ahead, I’m happy.

Web 2.5? Innovation within the paradigm.
I’ve brought the shrimp back for your enjoyment

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Filed under Education, play, Web 2.0

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